Our Wild Life in Samburu

Our Wild Life in Samburu

The more you watch elephants, the more you slip into their mind-scape and begin to see the world through their eyes.  Most of what I know about them I learnt by osmosis growing up amongst them while my parents did their research in the ’70s.  Later on, I was able to match my intuitive interpretations with what I read, which opened my eyes to the deep magic of the natural world. Spending time with elephants you appreciate how tender they are to one another, how independently minded each can be, the daily challenges faced by a matriarch as she tries to persuade her family to follow her lead, or her courage in times of danger.  Watching them opens up a window onto the whole world around them, because they are constantly interacting with all the other animal and plant species they live amongst.  So you can slip quietly from intense observation of one species to the next, until the inter-connectedness of all things becomes apparent. Perhaps what I’ve learnt most from growing up with elephants is the importance of this inter-connectedness – the fabric of life upon which we all depend – and of how critical wild spaces are for our sanity. It was perhaps this longing to return to natural “silence” that prompted Frank and I to relocate to Samburu district to bring our kids up at Elephant Watch Camp.  Both of us are deeply committed to the cause of saving elephants, but we also felt it was an amazing opportunity to open our kids’ eyes to a very different way of life and give them time to explore their imaginations and creativity while their brains were still uncluttered. At first they...
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